Imaging Spectroscopy@NICTA

With the advent of new camera technologies, imaging spectroscopy is now becoming available for land-based, close range inspection and image acquisition. This opens-up a wide variety of opportunities including applications in recycling, health, environmental management, and, eventually, in professional and consumer photography.

        At NICTA, we are working to advance Australian capabilities in key emerging imaging and sensing technologies beyond the visible spectrum with a strong focus in national prosperity and well being. We are developing technologies so as to exploit the opportunities, application areas and challenges involving the use of imaging spectroscopy as a means for scene understanding. This is important, since scene analysis in the scope of imaging spectroscopy involves the ability to robustly encode material properties, object composition and concentrations of primordial components in the scene. The combination of spatial and compositional information opens-up a vast number of application possibilities.

        Spectroscopic scene analysis can enable advanced capabilities for surveillance by permitting objects to be tracked based on material properties. In computational photography, images may be enhanced taking into account each specific material type in the scene. For food security, health and precision agriculture advanced statistical photometric techniques and software for processing spectral image data can be the basis for the development of diagnostic and surveying tools which can detect pests before symptoms are apparent to the naked eye.

        This combination of a broad domain of application with the use of key technologies makes the use of imaging spectroscopy a worthwhile opportunity for researchers in the areas of computer vision and pattern recognition. At the ISSA project, we are developing for functions such as material classification, surface structure analysis and constituent component analysis. Combining new spectral cameras and NICTA’s technology opens up many new applications in many industries.

       Our research has a twofold aim. Firstly, addressing the photometric invariance problem so as to recover features devoid of illumination variations, specularities and shadowing. Secondly, we aspire to explore the use of the imaging spectra for purposes of scene and object material classification.


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Quick links

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Imaging Spectroscopy for Scene Analysis

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NICTA
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ANU
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RSISE

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